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Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
detachment has been his foreign policy hallmark. "economy" writes that a tone of cool detachment has been his forei foreign-policy hallmark. from being the "indispensable nation, "mr. preside nation, "so how do you see the nex they are a catalyst present but t four years? not deeply involved. just to start you out on the huge threat of an iranian nuclear weapon, how does that factor into the second term? >> i think it's possible that this year there may be an action by israel against iran. it looked likely last year. i thought it was going to happen. and then it looked less likely. and people i'm speaking to think it is once again a possibility. that changes the entire dynamic. and this administration talks about wanting to shift to asia. sure, that sounds greatest. but i think it will be very difficult to do. especially in that happens. if the israelis decide after their elections that they are moving a little bit more to the right, if the iranian elections coming up bring that country even further to the right, it seems like some sort of clash is coming. that's just on the israel-iran. if y
this at all, richard, to discredit the president on foreign policy? >> i have to say that i think that benghazi is largely a function of people who suffer from obama-derangement syndrome, because i think that people who are kind of looking at the facts, does this trace to the white house, and does it trace to the president or the secretary of the state, and i h think that every bit of information that we have so far the answer to all of the questions so far is no. might they keep hammering it? of course, but at the end of the day, i don't believe we will look back in the second term and said, man, they should have gotten that benghazi behind them, because they have. >> and do you think that we will be talking about benghazi coming up? >> we, the facts and the more that the white house and the administration says this happened and by the way, that happened and not just from the partisan perspective, but coming from the state department and so forth, and with all respect, it is the senate role to ask the tough questions and the question is whether or not it is a legitimate con ver
of fundamental issues for a president, guns and keeping the government going and fighting for his foreign policy team. it's not like he's looked for a fight. let's face it, newtown forced everybody to deal with this. >> newtown has changed everything. >> i don't think he's looking for a fight. i think he's found one. >> i agree with you. i think since the election this has been the best period the president has had in the last four years. a lot of things have come together for him. he's in sync with the country, and the country is in sync for him. the question for the gop, are you prepared for this barack obama? you didn't seem to be able to handle the first one. are you prepared for this one who now has the kind of wind in his sails going into a second term that can be very, very good for him in terms of at least in the first six or so months laying down some hard lines for the gop to cross. i think they can, but they're going to have to make the argument, you know, from a principled position, get off the crazy noise we have -- >> don't they have -- >> distract -- >> on an issue we just talked
taxpayer? we'll explain in a dangerous foreign policy, next. [ slap! ] [ slap! slap! slap! slap! ] ow! ow! [ male announcer ] your favorite foods fighting you? fight back fast with tums. calcium-rich tums starts working so fast you'll forget you had heartburn. ♪ tum tum tum tum tums mommy's having a french fry. yes she is, yes she is. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. 100% vegetable juice, with three of your daily vegetable servings in every little bottle. woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart rate increases ] woman #2: but i don't even live near the water. what you don't know about flood insurance may shock you -- including the fact that a preferred risk policy starts as low as $129 a year. for an agent, call the number that appears on your screen. >> now, in an effort to unite the country, but in the end president barack obama's inaugural address was a campaign style stump speech and years from now not only remembered for his divisive combative tone, but exposed the
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the speech, however, briep, was the absence of foreign policy. and the two really contentious appointments, or at least one is chuck hagel who is going to run the defense department. and the middle east is aflame again and now we're seeing it spread into africa in a way that is very hard to get a fix for what the model is dealing with it. these are failed states. we have tribalism again prevailing in africa and again in the middle east because islamic rage has not been distinguished. command and control of al qaeda they believe has been broken down, but as you saw in algeria in the past several days, this is going to be a continuing problem out there. that will go to the defense department, how it's run, how much money they have to spend, how they reorganized the response of that and secretary kerry would is going to pick up the baton from hillary clinton has to decide what's our relationship with egypt? how run by a muslim brotherhood. >> it's worth remarking on that because four years ago, as we all sat here, none of us expected every assumption you would make about the middle east for d
once, he barely mentions economic growth or the private sector. think about foreign policy. he doesn't mention terrorism, jihaddism. a decade of war is ending. has anyone told the jihadists in algeria or the taliban in afghanistan? he didn't mention afghanistan, he didn't mention iran. how many times in his first term did president obama try to establish his bona fides as a tough guy by saying he would not let iran get nuclear weapons? not a word about it and, indeed, almost the opposite, that engage empty's the way -- engagement's the way to handle problem abroad. jon: we are heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends. >> it really struck me. two things about it. first of all, we would not have won the peace of after world war ii if we hadn't win the wore. he got out of iraq, he's getting us out of afghanistan or, he seems not to want to confront jihadists or the iranian regime, so the idea you can win a peace without winning the war is delusional. but also that sentence, in particular he says they didn't just win the wa
was in many ways provided the intellectual framework particularly for a lot of bush foreign policy. vice president biden used the senate and the relationships there and his practical skills has been invaluable in terms of promoting the agenda. >> now we have the marine band about to introduce the vice president of the united states. >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, the vice president of the united states, joseph r. biden, accompanied by inaugural coordinator for the joint congressional committee on ceremonies, kelly fado. senate department sergeant at arms, martina bradford. house saght at arms carry handley. harry reed and nancy pelosi. >> i said that was the marine band. it was the u.s. army herald trumpets. >> have to get that right. >> what were you saying mark? joe, joe, joe? >> i think this concerns what we were talking about. >> our first glimpse of the president as he walks through the hall, accompanied as you can see behind by chuck schumer head of the joint committee and next to him, lamar alexander of the bipartisanship on display and behind him the leadership of the house
to foreign policy and national security thing was his comment on the fact that we don't have to live with perpetual warfare for lives in decades. that could turn out to be one of the most important parts of the speech. we have national security and the defense budget, which i think is wildly out of control. it is a kind of old war budget for a very different era. and i hope that the president and the administration and republicans as well as democrats will take a good look at that. neil: did he miss an opportunity to do so? i know all about broad visions any spell out some of the details, but this was an opportunity to say that i see the magnitude of our debt. i see the magnitude of our problems. i am not oblivious to this. i want us all to join hands and look at ways to mutually get this down to size without dividing our social classes. i don't know if that opportunity was seized on appropriately enough today. >> well, i think it was a different kind of speech. but this is a president who has cut spending. he wants to cut more. i wish i could see that desire on a partisan basis, esp
're also entering into a new age of some beg decision in foreign policy because this country right now is starting to get some adversaries around the world because of our drone policy. that was not the situation four years ago. so this is -- our foreign policy is going to be judged on just how aggressive we get with that, and there's a growing concern in the community across the country about the drone attacks. just how many innocent people are we killing? there's been concerted conversation about we have to reel this in, and president obama, i think, is going to hear a great deal about that when it comes to foreign policy coming up here in the coming months. just how aggressive are we going to get? >> that specific reference that we should not be in a state of perpetual war. >> we are, and it's a different kind of war. >> i mean, that's the -- legally that's the justification that they cite for saying why it is that we can kill people in places where we're technically not waging some sort of war. that there is a global war still underway, and the authorization of using military force
at the president pulls a second term, this focusing on foreign policy and thand domestic issues. the president is facing a $16, $17 trillion debt. he is facing a pullout from afghanistan and our role in the world. guest: it is interesting. leadership, what does that mean. if you go back on the eve of the world war, the number of foreign military installations united compare that with, today. it was well under 100. the cold war has had an enormous transforming impact. dwight eisenhower cited all of this in his famous farewell address. i think there is a legitimate debate to be had over what is -- that is as old as the republic. washington post generation believed united states would be an asylum for the world also oppressed. -- world's oppressed. it was a place to which victims could come and enjoy the fruits of liberty. there was no sense that we were going to impose our vision or values on the rest of the world. host: this question, in case you missed earlier. why is the president having two swearing-in ceremonies? according to the inaugural committee, it has happened on six previous occasion
with president george w. bush and foreign policy will be happening in the second term. >> the first thing that strikes me on a day like today is what a wonderful celebration this is with our democracy. the peaceful transfer of power. of course president obama is being affirmed again, but we look at our institutions. you see the supreme court justice swear in the president. it's a wonderful thing and it's something that when you've traveled around the world, not every country can take this moment for granted. when the will of the people is confirmed and affirmed the way we're going to see today. >> the president is speaking to the world, he's speaking to the united states, he's speaking to the people in washington and he's speaking to republicans. what does he need to say to republicans? >> on inaugural day, it is really the high point for any presidency, i think, because after that we start to get back to our regular criticism, and we did this wrong and that wrong, and so i would hope the president would use the opportunity to say i've won the election, but this
the country the stakes could not be higher. the debt, deficit, entitlement reform. immigration, foreign policy problems tend to be incredibly important in second terms as presidents realize, while they become lame ducks that advancing domestic agenda legislation is very difficult. we'll see the president likely travel more and deal with much of his international legacy. trying to wrap up his second term as best he can with so much unfinished foreign policy business he inhurted from bush administration. buckle up, jeff. not with standing the poet's kind words and the president's lofty rhetoric, washington tomorrow goes back into the being the political crawl city it has been in past years and likely to escalate more so. happy day, shep. shepard: happy day. at least we have today and men and women from both political parties, from the far right, far left and all of those in the middle, they're about to sit down for some individual tils. happy they are all are, dvittles. secretary lew and the rest for new cabinet sick tears all with fights ahead. we seen former presidents interacting with paul ry
and cody keenan. ben rhodes usually takes the foreign policy side of things. jon favreau, he's usually most involved in this big vision. >> >> jennifer: he's like 31 years old. >> cody keenan also young. he always plays a hand in this. my guess would be -- i haven't spoken to favreau about this. he would be working on this closely with president obama. they do the speeches up until the last minute. on the nobel prize acceptance speech, obama came down from his hotel room with a copy of the speech, went to the fourth floor and gave changes to make on the way over to receive the speech. that could be going on right now. >> john: these guys write the speeches in terms of overview. they're there for structure and tone but it is the president himself who decides what the final content is going to be and who makes the revisions he needs to. how deep his editorial involvement is. >> jennifer: if you're going to be true to who you are, as president, you have to -- you have to have input on this. the language has to come from you, naturally. he's a good writer. obviously he's got significant opinion
. then he becomes a lame duck and then you have to start shifting more and more toward foreign policy, traveling around the world. on the domestic agend ahe has a very short time before he becomes a lame duck. >> the president's inaugural address tomorrow is a tradition that dates back to george washington in 1789. the president plans to look ahead more than back in the speech. let's get some insight from the wall street journal columnist. what are your thoughts on what the president needs to say in order to be most effective, to best set himself up, going into the next four years? >> reporter: well, i don't know. we will find out what he and his aides have decided about that, just about 24 hours from now. i think a second inaugural address is always a little bit difficult, you know? a first inaugural, everybody's new and excited and it's like superman coming out of the telephone booth and showing you the big "s" on his chest. a second inaugural is like, hi, it's me again. so you want to -- you want to try to make it fresh and new anyway. and i think this president has a real opportun
of foreign policy, andy. good to have you here. good to see you. on the subject of foreign policy the president said the following in part: we are heirs to those who want peace and not just the war who turn sworn enemies into the surest of friends-- >> i've lost the audio. >> megyn: unfortunately we've lost the audio, you can hear anddy say. we'll try to get those reestablished and these are the dangers of live tv and these are the official vases. >> inaugural gifts. >> megyn: the one that was presented to the vice-president joe biden has a more springtime etching on the side of it and we'll take a brief listen and eric cantor and the president and first lady standing up. [applause] [applause] >> the toasts are coming up right after this. and this is in by the way, statuary hall. this used to be long, long ago, the hold house chamber, now it is the area in front of where the house of representatives is. there's a statue of nearly every state in statuary hall and the halls around that area, as we see the president and vice-president receiving those gifts. >> megyn: it wasn't the b
. in that it was almost entirely about foreign policy. we would go anywhere, bear any price, pay any price, bear any burden to ensure the survival of liberty. this time, the president's foreign policy really was disspilled into seven words, a decade of war is now ending, the contrast of the last half century is striking. >> and jonathan karl who covers the white house for us, jon, i know you're in the capitol steps, the president saying we can't succumb to the fiction that all society's ills can be cured through government alone yet the bulk of the speech really praised and support and encouragement for all the things we do together through our government. >> george, i felt during much of that speech like i was listening to a democratic ronald reagan where reagan was unapologetically conservative. this was unapologetically progressive saying we must act collectively. and this was also bound with optimism saying america's possibilities are limitless. this was an effort, i believe, at that kind of optimistic progressivism whereas a reagan was your optimistic conservatism. also, i was very struck by on
of qaddafi was one of the great successes of their foreign policy. this was the origin of the phrase, leading from behind in the overthrow of qaddafi, yet obviously you have to judge a policy by its aftermath as well as people have criticized the bush administration for what happened in iraq after the overthrow of saddam hussein. libya was not just another embassy. it was not iceland. it wasn't france. it was a very dangerous place, and the fact that the administration would tout libya as a success, even as our ambassador in libya was describing the descent into kay yos that the -- chaos the country was seeing. the growth of terrorist cells and training camps, nothing was being done to affect security but nothing was being done to recognize the failure and the risk to american interests more broadly being reflected by the chaos growing in libya. jon: the administration asserted that the deaths of our ambassador and others resulted from this protest over the online video. the secretary was asked about that today and she got pretty angry, said what does it matter why this thing started. your th
fiscal cliff discussion, the economy is going to get zooming, we're going to -- foreign policy. >> it could end up being in foreign policy, drawing down troops, transitioning to this new kind of fighting force with the drone warfare, sort of in keeping with what we're alluding to eisenhower had. >> i think we're going to watch too very different but equally fascinating dramas play out. inside washington, the republicans still have the votes to stop the president on many things. they still control the house. they still have operational gridlock in the senate, if you will, even though democrats picked up. inside washington, the president has a challenge. but if you look at this, groundbreaking on gaye rights, back to climate change, gun control, immigration. and who that appeals to, as jack just said. they have made a doubling down of what they did in the campaign. they believe they have the coalition of the future -- young people, latinos, african-americans, and they believe the republican coalition is aging, in decline, and fractured. so they think politically they have the jui
of the second administration. second term. >> foreign policy is your expertise. three weeks ago we would not have thought of africa being a threat to americans. what concerns you about that situation? what can the president do about going forward? >> i think if we're talking about mali and places around mali, the president should support those who are going to lead the french. the french have a unique relationship and interest in mali. i think we should support them to the extent we can. they're one of our nato allies and they have been a friend of ours. but we have to keep our eye on the places. i don't think it will require american soldiers on the ground, but we have to realize that al qaeda has been badly diminished. let's not overlook the success we have had. but it doesn't mean it's gone away. and it doesn't mean that every al qaeda cell is getting ready to attack the united states of america. they're doing other things in the region as well. so be vigilant. help our friends. i don't think there's a need for a commitment of american troops. >> mr. secretary, thank you so much for b
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)

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